Customization in the new Firefox

29 April, 2014 § 5 Comments

Customization has always been a strong point for Firefox. From installing add-ons and themes to rearranging the controls in the toolbars, Firefox leads the pack in providing the best customization capabilities of any browser out there.

Providing user choice is central to Mozilla, and that is reflected strongly in Firefox. With our new and improved customization mode, users can now change what widgets will appear in their Firefox toolbar as well as the Firefox menu.

For example, users that often click on the “Save Page” button now have the ability to move the button to their toolbar in only two clicks of the mouse.

Moving the Save Page button to the toolbar

Conversely, users who sparingly use the Search box can now move it to the Firefox menu or remove it entirely. If you used Ctrl+K (Cmd+K on Mac) as a shortcut to access the Search box before, Firefox will still react to the shortcut even if the Search box has been moved to the Firefox menu.

Search in the menu

Firefox offers two easy ways to customize the browser. Simple customizations such as moving an item between the toolbar and the menu can be made by right-clicking on the widget that you wish to move. Deeper customizations can be made by entering the customization mode, accessible through the Customization button in the Firefox menu.

Customize Firefox

Our new customization mode even supports touch-sensitive screens, bringing customization “to your fingertips”:

Touch-based customization

With the new Firefox, you can now customize your toolbar and menu to make Firefox yours. If you’re already running Firefox, it will automatically update to the latest version. If not, you can download Firefox now, always free and always open.

Bookmarking in the new Firefox

28 April, 2014 § 3 Comments

This week’s release of Firefox brings an improved bookmarking experience, tightening the relationship between adding a bookmark and retrieving it.

Bookmarks Button

The traditional bookmark star has been moved out of the location bar and in to a new Bookmark Star + Bookmarks Menu widget. When a bookmark is added, a new animation shows the Bookmark Star filling in and bouncing over to the Bookmarks Menu.

A second click on the Bookmark Star allows you to tweak the bookmark name, folder, and tags. By default, bookmarks are placed in the Unsorted Bookmarks folder, which can be viewed by clicking on the Bookmarks Menu.

Edit This Bookmark

This new bookmarking widget doesn’t have to stay on your Firefox toolbar either. Firefox offers the best customization capabilities of all browsers, and this means that you can quickly move the widget to the new Firefox menu or hide it entirely.

Bookmarks context menu

This can be done quickly and effortlessly, by right-clicking on the Bookmarks widget and selecting either “Move to Menu” or “Remove from Toolbar”. You can also reposition the widget through the all-new customization mode that is accessible by clicking on the “Customize” button in the Firefox menu.

Bookmarks in the new Firefox menu

Clicking on the Bookmarks button in the Firefox menu will show the following view:

Bookmarks subview in the new Firefox menu

If you’re already running Firefox, it will automatically update to the latest version. If not, you can download Firefox now, always free and always open.

Australis-Styled Widgets Presentation

4 December, 2013 § 3 Comments

I’ve been pretty quiet this semester about the work that a team of students have been focused on. However, don’t let my quietness be a representation of how hard they have worked.

We’re now reaching the end of the semester and the students have put together a video of their work throughout the semester. The students were tasked with creating three add-ons for the upcoming Australis version of Firefox.

The goal of the project was to get feedback on the new Australis add-on APIs before it became too late to make significant changes. Through the process some bugs were filed, but none that caused us to have to go back and rethink our initial direction.

The three add-ons that the students were asked to create were a weather add-on, music add-on, and Bugzilla add-on. Please watch the video below to get an overview of their capabilities.

Video

You can view the source code for the Weather widget and the Bugzilla widget online.

Download a Holly nightly today

4 December, 2013 § 1 Comment

Continuing with the Australis work that much of the Firefox front-end team has been laser-focused on recently, we now have automatically updating nightly builds of Holly (Windows, OS X, Linux).

Firefox Holly

Holly is the version of Nightly that doesn’t include the Australis changes. We are running this special “backout” branch of Nightly because Australis won’t be ready to make the move to Firefox Aurora by the December 9th merge date.

We will continue to work on Australis in the Nightly 29 train, with the goal of Australis merging to Firefox Aurora 29. In the meantime, the Holly branch is what will be merged to Firefox Aurora 28.

It is very important that we have nightly testers who use Holly to help the Firefox community make sure that we have good code coverage over the changes that will be making their way to our Aurora population.

If you’d like to help test out the Holly branch, you can now download an auto-updating nightly build of Holly (Windows, OS X, Linux). Again, these will be very similar to the official Firefox Nightly builds with the exception that they don’t include the Australis user interface changes.

Good read: The value of Ignite

3 December, 2013 § Leave a comment

Recently I got a shout-out from Tricia Broderick in her blog post, “The value of Ignite“. The post was a great reminder of what someone can accomplish when they step out of their comfort zone and try something they’ve never done before.

We held multiple of these “Ignite” events at TechSmith. At each event we had about eight presenters who covered various work and non-work related topics. The twist to the presentations is that each slide can only be on-screen for 15 seconds (auto-advancing) and you only get 20 slides.

These turned out to be great activities for people to learn more about their coworkers as well as get practice presenting. See Tricia’s blog post for her take on the event.

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