New in Firefox Nightly: In-content Preferences

18 May, 2014 § 46 Comments

I’m happy to announce that starting today, the new in-content preferences are enabled by default in Firefox Nightly.

Preferences

This project was started by a group of students at Michigan State University and was mentored by Blair McBride and myself. Since its start, it has continued to get a ton of attention from contributors world-wide.

This is a list of people who have contributed patches to the in-content preferences as of this posting:

  • Ally Naaktgeboren
  • Andres Hernandez
  • Andrew Hurle
  • Benjamin Peterson
  • Benjamin Smedberg
  • Brendan Dahl
  • Brian R. Bondy
  • Brian Smith
  • Carsten “Tomcat” Book
  • Chris Mahoney
  • Chris Peterson
  • Christian Ascheberg
  • Christian Sonne
  • Devan Sayles
  • Dão Gottwald
  • Ed Morley
  • Ehsan Akhgari
  • Florian Quèze
  • Gervase Markham
  • Gijs Kruitbosch
  • Gregory Szorc
  • Honza Bambas
  • Jan de Mooij
  • Jan Varga
  • Jared Wein
  • Javi Rueda
  • Jeff Walden
  • John Schoenick
  • Jon Rietveld
  • Jonathan Mayer
  • Josh Matthews
  • JosiahOne
  • Kyle Machulis
  • Mahdi Dibaiee
  • Manish Goregaokar
  • Manish Goregaokar
  • Mark Hammond
  • Martin Stransky
  • Matthew Noorenberghe
  • Michael Harrison
  • Mike Connor
  • Mike Hommey
  • Ms2ger
  • Nicholas Nethercote
  • Nick Alexander
  • Owen Carpenter
  • Paolo Amadini
  • Phil Ringnalda
  • Richard Marti
  • Richard Newman
  • rsx11m
  • Ryan VanderMeulen
  • Sebastian Hengst
  • Sid Stamm
  • Ted Mielczarek
  • Theo Chevalier
  • Tim Taubert
  • Yosy
  • Zuhao (Joe) Chen

There is still a lot of work to be done before shipping the new in-content preferences out to people on the release builds of Firefox. That also means that this long list of contributors doesn’t have to stay at 59 people, it can keep growing :)

We have a list of bugs that we need to fix before we can call version 1 of this project complete. The easiest way for someone new to help out is to download Firefox Nightly and help test that the new preferences work just as well as the old preferences. If you find an issue and see that it hasn’t already been reported, please file a new bug in Bugzilla and leave a comment on this blog post with a link to the bug that you filed.

In-Content Preferences

Australis-Styled Widgets Presentation

4 December, 2013 § 3 Comments

I’ve been pretty quiet this semester about the work that a team of students have been focused on. However, don’t let my quietness be a representation of how hard they have worked.

We’re now reaching the end of the semester and the students have put together a video of their work throughout the semester. The students were tasked with creating three add-ons for the upcoming Australis version of Firefox.

The goal of the project was to get feedback on the new Australis add-on APIs before it became too late to make significant changes. Through the process some bugs were filed, but none that caused us to have to go back and rethink our initial direction.

The three add-ons that the students were asked to create were a weather add-on, music add-on, and Bugzilla add-on. Please watch the video below to get an overview of their capabilities.

Video

You can view the source code for the Weather widget and the Bugzilla widget online.

This Friday: Computer Science as a Profession

13 November, 2013 § 1 Comment

This Friday I’ll be giving a talk to 250 primarily first-year students majoring in Computer Science at Michigan State University. This presentation is part of their CSE 100: Computer Science as a Profession course that students are required to take.

I’m planning on starting with an overview of Mozilla and some of the unique technical challenges that I’ve had to solve. One of the really cool things about working at Mozilla is getting to see and experience up front the wide spectrum of computing problems that are being tackled.

Within the Mozilla community, there are people working on the forefront of research by implementing a new memory-safe and concurrent programming language (Rust) and parallel browser engine (Servo) to finding innovative ways to get people more involved with producing web content (Webmaker).

I will try to record the presentation, but I can’t make any guarantees.

I feel very honored to receive an invitation to give this talk, and I’m greatly looking forward to it. If you have some helpful tips for college freshman, please do share in the comments below.

Interview with Ray Heldt about contributing to Firefox (Part 3/3)

15 March, 2013 § Leave a comment

I sat down a couple days ago with Ray Heldt. Ray is one of the MSU students working on multitouch gestures for Firefox. I asked Ray about his experience and what he thought about contributing to open-source software.

Check out the video below for the interview (1m 38s):

I also got a chance to interview the other two students working on the project, Bill de Araujo and Brandon Waterloo. I posted Bill’s interview a couple days ago and Brandon’s interview yesterday.

Interview with Brandon Waterloo about contributing to Firefox (Part 2/3)

14 March, 2013 § 1 Comment

I sat down yesterday with Brandon Waterloo. Brandon is one of the MSU students working on multitouch gestures for Firefox. I asked Brandon about his experience and what he thought about contributing to open-source software.

Check out the video below for the interview (3m 13s):

I also got a chance to interview the other two students working on the project, Bill de Araujo and Ray Heldt. I posted Bill’s interview previously and will be posting Ray’s interview shortly.

Interview with Bill de Araujo about contributing to Firefox (Part 1/3)

12 March, 2013 § 2 Comments

I sat down today with Bill de Araujo. Bill is one of the MSU students working on multitouch gestures for Firefox. I asked Bill about his experience and what he thought about contributing to open-source software.

Check out the video below for the interview (1m 31s):

I also got a chance to interview the other two students working on the project, Brandon Waterloo and Ray Heldt. I’ll be posting their interviews in the coming days.

By golly, we’re getting somewhere… (cross-post)

6 February, 2013 § Leave a comment

Raymond HeldtRaymond Heldt wrote up a great, and funny, blog post covering the current progress of the MSU Capstone project to implement Safari-style pinch-to-zoom for desktop Firefox. While working on the project, the students learned that there are similar plans to implement this feature for Firefox on Windows Metro.

The Windows Metro implementation is planning to use off-main-thread compositing and B2G’s AsyncPanZoomController implementation. The students are pushing ahead on their <canvas> based approach, since OMTC and AsyncZoomPanController are not fully ported to desktop builds.

Below is a snippet of Raymond’s post.

Well, the day started out with another abandon-my-attempt-at-implementing-something-because-it-already-got-it-taken-care-of-without-me moment, but beyond that, I was happy with my contributions today.

A scaling screenshot on pinch-to-zoom has been implemented (no thanks to myself), but for some absolutely insane reason, sometimes that screenshot gets drawn over the webpage’s content, sometimes not (although you can see animation through the “holes” of a webpage where they put advertisement boxes). Michigan State’s website scales fine, mxr.mozilla.org scales fine, Yahoo! sometimes scales fine DEPENDING ON WHICH CURRENT EVENT STORY IS CURRENTLY BEING DISPLAYED!!!, and then there’s websites that don’t hide the content and cover up the animation, like Amazon and Google and our CSE498 page on Michigan State’s website. Weird, I know.

But anyway, back to what I did. Figuring out some algorithms for x- and y- offset, I was able to get zooming relative to the center of the screen (adjusting for scrolling) instead of from the top-left corner. …

Head over to Raymond’s blog to read the full post.

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